AMD
AMD

This article is based on an article from the Japanese edition of Engadget and was created using the translation tool Deepl.


AMD held an online launch event to announce the new Ryzen 5000 series of CPUs for desktop PCs based on the Zen 3 architecture.

The most powerful Ryzen 9 5950X is a 16-core/32-thread chip, with a 3.4 GHz clocks (up to 4.9 GHz), It has 72MB of L2 and L3 cache, and a TDP of 105W. Priced at $799.

The new generation of the Zen 3 architecture uses the Unified 8-Core Complex, which integrates up to eight CPU cores and 32MB of L3 cache per die (the Zen 2 has four CPU cores and 16MB of L3 cache). This has reduced the latency that occurs in communication between cores and in accessing the L3 cache, according to the company.

AMD
AMD

These performance improvements are especially useful for applications where you want to keep performance as high as possible, such as gameplay and live gaming. Overall, the Zen3 offers 24 percent faster performance per watt compared to the Zen2 and is 2.4 times faster than the Zen1, according to the company.

The Zen 3 architecture has a 19% improvement in Instruction Per Clock (IPC) compared to the Zen 2. The single-threaded performance, which has been considered a weakness against Intel's CPUs, was also shown at the launch event, with the Ryzen 9 5900X scoring higher than the Core i9-10900K in a CINEBENCH R20 comparison.

AMD
AMD

The Ryzen 5000 series was announced at the launch event, led by Ryzen 9 5950X, introduced at the beginning of the article, as well as the following

  • Ryzen 7 5900X (12 cores, 24 threads, 3.7 GHz to 4.8 GHz, 70 MB of L2/L3 cache, 105W TDP, $549)

  • Ryzen 7 5800X (8 cores, 16 threads, 3.8 GHz to 4.7 GHz, 36 MB of L2/L3 cache, 105W TDP, $449)

  • Ryzen 5 5600X (6 cores, 12 threads, 3.7 GHz to 4.6 GHz, 35 MB of L2/L3 cache, 65W TDP, $299)

Of these, only the Ryzen 5600X comes with a cooling fan.

All of them have a release date of November 5 in the US.

Source: AMD 1, 2


This article is based on an article from the Japanese edition of Engadget and was created using the translation tool Deepl. The Japanese edition of Engadget does not guarantee the accuracy or reliability of this article.