Apple Silicon

This article is based on an article from the Japanese edition of Engadget and was created using the translation tool Deepl.


With Apple's proprietary chip Apple Silicon-powered Macs are likely to be announced at an event on November 10, the purported benchmark score of the A14X, which is expected to be used in them, has been reported.

The A14X is rumored to be based on the A14Bionic from the iPhone 12 series and will be manufactured on the 5nm process by TSMC in Taiwan. It was expected to be used in the first Apple Silicon Mac notebooks to come out, according to several sources.

According to AppleInsider, the A14X's benchmarks show a 1.80GHz processor capable of turbo boosting up to 3.10GHz, which is the first Apple-designed chip (such as the A-series in the iPhone and iPad) to ever clock above 3GHz. It is an 8-core processor, and the GPU has 8GB of RAM.

The A14X has a single-core score of 1634, which is better than the A12Z's 1118 on the iPad Pro (2020), but not much different than the A14's 1583. However, it hits a multi-core score of 7220, far ahead of the A12Z's 4657 and the A14's 4198.

The 16-inch MacBook Pro with an Intel Core-i9 processor has a single-core score of 1096 and a multi-core score of 6869, so the numbers alone show that the A14X-powered Mac could outperform all current MacBook Pro's.

However, according to AppleInsider, the benchmark testing was reportedly "performed with Geekbench 5 on an unknown device," with the caveat that the benchmark has not been verified as real or not.

If the benchmark results are accurate, they should hold great promise for Apple Silicon and Mac's performance improvements. At the "one more thing" event on the 10th, the Apple Silicon version of the 13-inch MacBook Pro and MacBook Air are expected to be announced, and this may be one of the factors that will help you make a decision about purchasing them.

Source: AppleInsider


This article is based on an article from the Japanese edition of Engadget and was created using the translation tool Deepl. The Japanese edition of Engadget does not guarantee the accuracy or reliability of this article.