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This article is based on an article from the Japanese edition of Engadget and was created using the translation tool Deepl.


Google relaunched the G Suite as Google Workspace in October, and with it, it's also revamped its logos for Gmail, Calendar, Drive, Docs, and Meet. The new design, however, had some people saying that each icon had the same color scheme and similar shapes, making it difficult to distinguish between them when displayed on a smaller scale (the image above shows the old version of the logo at the top and the new one at the bottom).

In response to such calls, an unofficial plugin (extension) has been released that allows you to revert to the old logos of Google services that appear on Chrome tabs.

The shape of the logo is not so much of a problem as long as you open and use the Google service directly, but the problem is when the logo is displayed in a small size on a small tab. All the logos are colored in the familiar Google colors of blue, red, yellow, and green, so it's hard to tell them apart, and some people have been complaining that they all look the same, as shown below.

This newly released extension, Restore old Google icons, revert the Google’s icons back to their older designs on the Chrome tab. It's just a simple plugin with no other features.

But the old versions of the logos are easy to recognize at a glance on the tabs, and it seems to provide an unquantifiable productivity boost.

The extension is only available on the desktop version of Chrome (and the Chromium version of Microsoft Edge, which is compatible with it) and not on the mobile version of Chrome on iOS/iPadOS or Android. However, considering that it's not a common situation to "open so many tabs that all you can see is the Google Services logos" on an iPad or Android tablet, it might not be much of a problem.

Source: Restore old Google icons (Chrome Web Store)

Via: Gizmodo (US)


This article is based on an article from the Japanese edition of Engadget and was created using the translation tool Deepl. The Japanese edition of Engadget does not guarantee the accuracy or reliability of this article.