Apple Silicon Mac

This article is based on an article from the Japanese edition of Engadget and was created using the translation tool Deepl.


Apple has announced the "one more thing" event on November 10, as well as the official page, and it has been revealed that there is AR content hidden there for iPhones and iPads.

This twist was also planted on the official page of the recent iPhone 12 launch event. It's already gone beyond a surprise and has become a little tradition.

Access the page in Safari for iOS or iPad OS and tap the Apple logo to start the AR experience. There's an AR mode that lets you superimpose an AR object on a real-life landscape, and there's also a mode that lets you enjoy an object only.

In this AR content, the Apple logo lies flat, and when you tap on it, it rises up as if it were opening the MacBook's lid. A reader of 9to5Mac reports that if you rotate the AR Apple logo, or walk around to the back, you can see the event date 11.10, but I haven't been able to confirm that on my end.

Just as "Time Flies" at the September event hinted at the Apple Watch Series 6, "Hi, Speed" at the October event hinted at a 5G-enabled iPhone, and the circular logo hinted at the HomePod mini, this AR is supposed to hint to a new MacBook series powered by the Apple Silicon proprietary chip. It's all the more exciting since it's just when Bloomberg reported a rumor that the Apple Silicon versions of the 13-inch MacBook Pro and Air will be announced at the same event.

On the other hand, the Apple Silicon version of the Mac Pro and iMac are expected to appear after 2021, so it seems likely that they won't show up at this event.

While Apple Silicon-powered Macs are reported to have high potential, there's a lot of uncertainty regarding the working of existing macOS apps for Intel chips, as well as BootCamp and virtualization apps that run Windows apps on the Mac. Desktop Mac users may want to keep an eye on the Apple Silicon MacBook series, which seems to be ahead of the curve.

Source: Apple

Via: 9to5Mac


This article is based on an article from the Japanese edition of Engadget and was created using the translation tool Deepl. The Japanese edition of Engadget does not guarantee the accuracy or reliability of this article.