BigSur
Apple

This article is based on an article from the Japanese edition of Engadget and was created using the translation tool Deepl.


Apple launched macOS Big Sur on November 12, the first major update in nearly a year since iTunes was split into three parts, macOS Catalina.

You can update by going to the Mac App Store under "Update" or by going to the macOS Big Sur page and clicking the "Update Now" button.

The first major update is a redesigned screen. Apps now have a full-height sidebar and a reworked toolbar, and the Dock is now easier to find the apps you use most often. And the Control Center and Notification Center have also been improved in terms of accessibility and visibility, and Safari has been speeded up. There's also support for automatic device switching for AirPods, and the iPad version of the apps have been ported over by Mac Catalyst, and other refinements throughout.

And at the recent "one more thing" event, the company also announced tighter integration with Macs with Apple Silicon "M1" chip. The Mac will now instantly wakes from sleep, making everyday tasks a breeze. And in addition to implementing Rosetta 2, which makes existing Mac apps work seamlessly, you can now run iPhone and iPad apps on the Mac as well.

Devices supported by macOS Big Sur include the M1 chip-equipped MacBook Air, 13-inch MacBook Pro and Mac mini (shipped pre-installed), and existing models that are eligible for the update, as follows.

  • MacBook (2015 or later)

  • MacBook Air (2013 or later)

  • MacBook Pro (Late 2013 or later)

  • Mac mini (2014 or later)

  • iMac (2014 or later)

  • iMac Pro (2017 or later)

  • Mac Pro (2013 or later)

For more information on each feature, check out the articles below.

macOS 11 Big Sur new features: Refreshed Design, Much-enhanced Notification Center and more

macOS Big Sur public beta review: Integration with iOS progressing towards the Apple Silicon Mac


This article is based on an article from the Japanese edition of Engadget and was created using the translation tool Deepl. The Japanese edition of Engadget does not guarantee the accuracy or reliability of this article.