iPhone12mini

This article is based on an article from the Japanese edition of Engadget and was created using the translation tool Deepl.


The iPhone 12 mini was just released on November 13, but there have been a number of user reports of problems with the sensitivity of the lock screen, and it may not respond to finger touches in some cases.

These have been posted on Apple's official support forums, as well as on Apple-related news sites such as MacRumors and Reddit.

Most users say the problem comes about when swiping up from the bottom of the lock screen using their thumb to unlock the device, or when pressing the LED light or camera buttons on the lock screen. More specifically, this is most often the case with an iPhone 12 mini that has both a screen protection film and case.

However, it is somewhat more responsive when using fingers other than the thumb (although devices that can be held with one hand, such as the iPhone 12 mini, are usually operated with the thumb), and it is also generally common to report that once unlocked, there are no sensitivity issues.

Some users have reported that the issue disappears when the phone is plugged into a wall charger, or when touching the frame with the case removed, which some speculate could be a conductivity or grounding (which allows static electricity to escape) issue. It is true that with my iPhone 12 mini, there is a difference in the sensitivity of the lock screen between wearing the screen protector film alone and wearing the case together.

The U.S. Engadget has contacted Apple and is awaiting a response as of the 15th. At the time of writing, it's not clear how wide a range of users are affected by this issue.

The "grounding issue" above is also just speculation, and it hasn't been identified whether the cause is hardware or software. If it's the latter, then an iOS update can fix the problem, but we'll have to wait for Apple's response.

Source: MacRumors, Apple, Reddit


This article is based on an article from the Japanese edition of Engadget and was created using the translation tool Deepl. The Japanese edition of Engadget does not guarantee the accuracy or reliability of this article.