27imacteardown
OWC

This article is based on an article from the Japanese edition of Engadget and was created using the translation tool Deepl.


The new 27-inch iMac, announced just last week, has been quickly disassembled, and a video report has been released.

On August 7, OWC, a well-established brand of Mac modification parts and peripherals, released a video report on YouTube showing the disassembly process of the new 27-inch iMac. The target of the disassembly is the higher-end model, which comes standard with a 3.8GHz 8-core 10th generation Intel Core i7 processor with 8GB of memory and a 512GB SSD for storage.

We've previously reported that there are no exterior changes from the previous model, and the screen is still the same Retina 5K display with 5120 x 2880 resolution (but with the addition of the Nano-texture glass option). The internal differences you'll notice immediately in this disassembled video are the ambient light sensor for True Tone, cabling for the FaceTime HD camera upgraded to 1080p, and an additional microphone stuck to the case.

The biggest change is still the fact that all models have moved to SSDs, so there are no more mechanically operated HDDs. OWC says that this has reduced the amount of wiring that's tricky to remove and made disassembly a lot faster. OWC says that this has reduced the amount of wiring that's tricky to remove and made disassembly a lot faster. That space has not been filled, and there's no additional cooling fan like the iMac Pro (2018), but perhaps there are cost reasons for this.

And as was recently rumored, we can confirm that the new logic board will no longer have a SATA connector and a small SSD directly soldered to it. The 4TB and 8TB configurations were also reportedly soldered with expansion boards for SSD connections instead.

Other than these minor updates, it's pretty much the same as the previous model, right down to the power and cooling systems, socketed CPU and headphone jack. The speakers have been upgraded, but there are no visually recognizable differences.

The "iPad Pro-like design, T2 chip, no Fusion Drive" prediction made just before WWDC20 in June was half right and half wrong. The new iMac design, which has a narrower bezel and a Pro Display XDR-like design, may have to wait for an Apple Silicon-powered model to arrive.

Source: OWC(YouTube)

Via: MacRumors


This article is based on an article from the Japanese edition of Engadget and was created using the translation tool Deepl. The Japanese edition of Engadget does not guarantee the accuracy or reliability of this article.