Apple Silicon
Apple

This article is based on an article from the Japanese edition of Engadget and was created using the translation tool Deepl.


Three models - MacBook Air, MacBook Pro, and Mac mini - are equipped with Apple's proprietary M1 chip. These new models have just been announced, but the purported benchmark scores for them have already been released.

In fact, the familiar Geekbench Browser site has posted the scores results for the purported MacBook Air with Apple silicon (M1 chip) and 8GB RAM. Its single-core score is 1687, its multi-core score is 7433, and its base frequency is listed as 3.2 GHz.

Geekbench

When compared to existing Apple products, the M1 chip version of the MacBook Air scores above that of all iOS devices. The iPhone 12 Pro, for example, has a single-core score of 1584 and a multi-core of 3898, and the fourth-generation iPad Air, which currently ranks highest on Geekbench among iOS/iPadOS devices, has a single-core of 1588 and a multi-core of 4647.

The score, which claims to be the M1 version of the MacBook Air, beats both of these.

And even when compared to the Macs, the single-core surpasses all existing models. While it trails the 27-inch iMac (2020), iMac Pro (2017), and Mac Pro (2019) in multi-core performance, it's still a remarkable achievement, surpassing all MacBook Pro models, including the 16-inch MacBook Pro with the 9th generation Intel Core i9 (2.4GHz).

Geekbench

The M1 version of the MacBook Air is a fanless design, while the MacBook Pro has Apple's own cooling system that includes a fan, so even if they have the same chip, the differences in thermal design are likely to result in differences in performance.

However, the M1 version of the Mac mini also has similar scores, so there doesn't seem to be a significant difference, at least at the benchmark level.

There are also benchmark results purportedly from the M1 version of the 13-inch MacBook Pro (16 GB of RAM). This one has a single-core score of 1714 and a multi-core score of 6802. The base frequency is supposed to be the same as the MacBook Air at 3.2GHz, but for some reason, the multi-core is lower than the Air, but the trend of "almost surpassing the current Intel versions of the MacBook Pro" is still the same.

However, the existing Intel version MacBook Pro, Mac mini, etc. can use external GPUs, whereas Apple Silicon Macs have been found to not support external GPUs in at least three current models. This may be one of the reasons why the Intel version of the 13-inch MacBook Pro continues to be sold alongside the new M1-powered model even after the announcement of the new model.

Source: Geekbench Browser

Via: MacRumors


This article is based on an article from the Japanese edition of Engadget and was created using the translation tool Deepl. The Japanese edition of Engadget does not guarantee the accuracy or reliability of this article.