OneGX1 7-inch gaming PC review: Portable game console and PC in one unit

Although the graphics performance is not high...

Engadget JP (Translation)
Engadget JP (Translation) , @Engadget_MT
2020年08月3日, 午後 07:16 in egmt
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OneGX1

This article is based on an article from the Japanese edition of Engadget and was created using the translation tool Deepl.


The OneGX1 is the latest UMPC from China's One-Netbook. Tech One, the official distributor for the One-Netbook in Japan, is scheduled to release it in mid-August, and as of the end of July, they are accepting reservations.

We borrowed the OneGX1 from Tech One to check it out immediately. The borrowed unit is a prototype, so there is a possibility that the details may differ from the production version.

The OneGX1 is a UMPC with a 7-inch display (1920 x 1200), and what it features is a controller that can be separated like the Nintendo Switch. You can use the left and right controllers as a single game controller, or you can hold each side separately and play games with two people.

OneGX1
Without the controller, it looks like a typical UMPC.

Without the controller attached, it looks like a typical UMPC, but it calls itself a gaming PC, and the exhaust port on the back is quite large for a UMPC. The fan noise is also proportionately loud, so you'll need to be careful when using it in a quiet environment.

OneGX1
Typical gaming PC-like back.

OneGX1
Air intakes are provided on the bottom.

OneGX1
Interface: USB Type-C (3.2 Gen2) with PD support, USB-Type-C (3.0), USB Type-A (3.0) and 3.5mm earphone jack on the back

The product comes with a 45-watt PD-compatible adapter, but we were also able to charge it from a mobile battery.

OneGX1
Supports 5V/9V/12V/15V charging

OneGX1
A microHDMI output terminal on the right side. I wanted a full-sized HDMI terminal, but I guess the mounting space was tight.

There is a SIM slot for the dual purpose of microSD on the left side, but only the LTE model can carry a SIM card.

OneGX1
The tray is listed as a dual-SIM, but only one side is available.

OneGX1
The front has a mesh-like finish, but there is only one microphone hole (?) is mixed in. Although it is small at 7 inches, the thickness is 21mm.

OneGX1
OneMix 3S (left) and OneGX1 (right), which when placed side by side with the 8.4-inch OneMix 3S, you can clearly see that they are one size smaller.

OneGX1
Weighing 645.4 grams, the Wi-Fi model is about 20 grams lighter than the LTE model.

Being a 7-inch, the keyboard is quite cramped. The key pitch for the alphabet keys is about 14mm. The keyboard itself isn't bad, with a moderate click, but it's also tough to put your fingers on the home position, which makes touch typing difficult. I also noticed that the keyboard deflected slightly when pressing keys on both ends, such as left Shift and Enter.

On the front side, there are optical pointing devices and mouse buttons. Shining in the top center is the power button. Unfortunately, the fingerprint sensor is not included.

OneGX1

The small number keys are also a concern. Some games that use the keyboard make heavy use of the number keys, but to be honest, I found them quite difficult to type. It seems that it would be best to divide the keyboard as a supplementary tool for chatting, etc. and use the controller for games.

OneGx1
Touch typing is quite tough.

OneGX1
The keyboard glows. It's a typical gaming PC specification.

Controllers are connected via Bluetooth

The OneGX1 is unique in that it has detachable controllers.

OneGX1

Like the Nintendo Switch, these controllers look like they charge when you attach them to the console, and connect to Bluetooth when you remove them... but in reality, they are only attached to the console, and have no electrical contacts. It always has a Bluetooth connection, even when attached.

This may be because it's a prototype, but I had to pair the left and right controllers separately, and on the PC, the two controllers are connected at the same time.

OneGX1
There are no electrical contacts at the junction, they are simply attached.

OneGX1
The main body is machined out of aluminum, but the controller is plastic. It feels a little cheap.

OneGX1
A mounting adapter to connect the two controllers will also be available on the market.

OneGX1
Remove the rubber cover on the bottom and you'll find the charging port (USB Type-C).

Also, charging has to be done on each controller, which is a bit of a hassle.

The feel of the controls isn't bad, and the game could be played with no problems. However, when the controller is attached to the main body, the weight exceeds 760g, so it is honestly hard to hold it with both hands and play it. If you're propping your elbows up on a table, it's probably not a problem, but it would be tough to play it lying face down on a bed like the Nintendo Switch (about 400g).

OneGX1
The horizontal size is about the same as the Nintendo Switch.

PC that can serve as a Switch-like device

The OneGX1 is powered by a 10th generation Core i5-10210Y, with an on-board Intel UHD Graphics 615 GPU. 8GB and 16GB of RAM are available, with the 16GB model being the one we tested.

As expected when it comes to i5, I don't feel any sluggishness in starting applications or browsers, and I can use it without stress, except that the keyboard is small (and the screen is small).

As for the games, Minecraft Dungeons, which is a bit heavier than it would be on a non-powered machine, was fine to play itself, although it was a bit choppy. If there aren't too many enemy mobs, it's around 50 FPS, and if there are a bunch of enemy mobs, it's around 15 FPS.

However, in this game, you have to use the number keys to use items with the keyboard. As I mentioned above, the number keys are small, so that part of the game is quite difficult to control. After all, a controller is probably essential for the game.

OneGX1
Minecraft Dungeons is playable, but it's tough to control on the keyboard.

We tried out the benchmarks and found that the CINEBENCH R20 was 965pts, PCMark 10 was 2842, and 3DMark (TimeSpy) was 358.

CINEBENCH
CINEBENCH R20

PCMARK 10
PCMark 10
3DMark
3DMark
OneGX1
The Dragon Quest IX benchmark is "very comfortable" at 7127.

Although the OneGX1 claims to be a gaming UMPC, its graphics performance is low because it only has an integrated GPU. Unlike its rival, the GPD Win MAX, the OneGX1 doesn't have the ability to use an external GPU, so the latest AAA titles that require high graphics performance will be tough to beat.

On the other hand, if you're playing a light game that doesn't require a lot of graphics performance, you'll be able to play it anywhere, and if you use the LTE-enabled model, you'll be able to communicate on its own, and if you use it with a dedicated controller, it can be used as a PC that plays a role like Switch, so you'll be able to play games more efficiently.


Related Link: OneGx1 | One-Netbook Official Japanese Site


This article is based on an article from the Japanese edition of Engadget and was created using the translation tool Deepl. The Japanese edition of Engadget does not guarantee the accuracy or reliability of this article.

 
 
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関連キーワード: egmt, onegx1, UMPC, personal computing, ONE-NETBOOK Technology, news, gear
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