Windows bridge

This article is based on an article from the Japanese edition of Engadget and was created using the translation tool Deepl.


It was recently rumored that Microsoft was "preparing a solution to allow Android apps to run on Windows 10", and now we have a more detailed follow-up report.

According to anonymous sources at Microsoft-related information site Windows Central, the company is working on a way for app developers to package their Android apps into MSIX format and submit them to the Microsoft Store with little or no code changes. The project has been code-named "Latte" and could be released as early as 2021, it has been stated.

In the past, Microsoft announced Windows Bridge (title image), a toolkit that facilitates porting apps on various platforms to solve the lack of software for Windows 10 Mobile. Its Project Astoria, a development project for the Android environment, never saw the light of day (apparently due to security and piracy issues), but Project Latte is aiming for a similar environment. The speculation is that this will probably be accomplished by the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL).

However, Google does not allow Play services to be installed on any device other than native Android devices and Chrome OS, so it is unlikely that Play services will be supported. This means that apps that require the Play Service API will have to be updated to break that dependency before they can be published for Windows 10 and cannot be published outright.

In general, it seems similar to Apple's Project Catalyst approach in terms of "converting mobile apps to desktop apps". And as Catalyst was said to require adjustments between platforms with different screen sizes, the porting may not be so easy.

In recent years, Microsoft has been encouraging people to switch to iOS and Android even when Windows 10 Mobile support ended. If Project Latte is realized, PWA, UWP, Win32 apps, Linux (via WSL) and Android-derived apps will be able to run on Windows 10, making it even more convenient.

Source: Windows Central


This article is based on an article from the Japanese edition of Engadget and was created using the translation tool Deepl. The Japanese edition of Engadget does not guarantee the accuracy or reliability of this article.