Rocket Lab
Rocket Lab

This article is based on an article from the Japanese edition of Engadget and was created using the translation tool Deepl.

Rocket Lab's Electron rocket, launched on July 4, experienced an anomaly while firing its second stage booster four to six minutes after liftoff. Seven satellites that were on board failed to be injected into orbit. One of the lost satellites included Japan's Canon Electronics' CE-SAT-IB.

The Electron rocket appeared to be doing well from ignition to takeoff and separation of the first stage booster, but shortly after the on-board footage, which was supposed to be ascending, appeared to have lost some altitude, it stopped and then switched to the control room and never returned to the rocket's image.

Peter Beck, founder of Rocket Labs, took to Twitter to apologize to the companies that developed the satellite the rocket was carrying, saying, "We apologize profusely." He said the accident is a reminder that space is always unforgiving, and that there are many lessons to be learned from this incident. He also said that until the cause of the accident is investigated and resolved, there will be no more launches.

The Canon Electronics CE-SAT-IB, on board the rocket was, despite its small size (500 mm x 500 mm x 850 mm and 67 kg), scheduled to carry out a two-year demonstration experiment, including the ability to take satellite photos from an altitude of 500 km to a ground resolution of 90 cm, using two consumer-grade digital cameras, the EOS 5D Mark III for telephoto and the PowerShot S110 for wide-angle.

The Electron rocket has had 12 successful launches and has successfully put 53 payloads into orbit. While this is not the first time it has failed, this may be its biggest loss to date.

source:Rocket Lab
via:CBS News

This article is based on an article from the Japanese edition of Engadget and was created using the translation tool Deepl. The Japanese edition of Engadget does not guarantee the accuracy or reliability of this article.