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This article is based on an article from the Japanese edition of Engadget and was created using the translation tool Deepl.


Recently, an Apple executive admitted that it is technically possible to run Windows 10 for Arm on a Mac with the M1 chip, and it was controversially stated that it was "really up to Microsoft" to choose whether to license it.

And indeed, a software developer has reported successfully running a virtualized Arm version of Windows (Windows ARM 64 Insider Preview) on an M1 Mac.

The results were shared on Twitter by developer Alexander Graf. The results were "pretty snappy," he said.

The way it works is to apply a custom patch to the open-source virtual machine emulator QEMU, specifically. And then virtualize it through the Hypervisor.framework (a hypervisor-type virtualization framework that directly controls the hardware; added in OS X Yosemite).

Apple had announced that the Hypervisor framework "allows users to interact with virtualization technologies without having to write kernel extensions". QEMU, on the other hand, is known for "achieving near-native performance" by executing the guest code directly on the host CPU.

It's not as fast as Rosetta 2, but close," he said of the Arm version of Windows running on an M1-based Mac with that combination.

He also says what he did is "definitely possible to reproduce," but it's still in its early stages (as of November 27), "so don't expect a stable, fully functional system yet." Regardless, he has demonstrated that Windows for the Arm works on an M1-based Mac.

If a homegrown developer was able to achieve this, it's not unlikely that Apple has done so internally as well. Craig Federighi, the Apple executive who made the above statement, may be pushing Microsoft to make a decision with those results behind him.

Source: The 8-bit

Via: MacRumors


This article is based on an article from the Japanese edition of Engadget and was created using the translation tool Deepl. The Japanese edition of Engadget does not guarantee the accuracy or reliability of this article.