Guangzhou. China - December 1, 2016: Apple iPhone 7 screen with social media applications icons Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, Twitter and more other
DKart via Getty Images

This article is based on an article from the Japanese edition of Engadget and was created using the translation tool Deepl.


Twitter has been introducing a number of new features, including "fleets," where tweets disappear 24 hours after being posted, and has revealed that it is currently "exploring" the addition of a "dislike" button and a "downvote" system.

Kayvon Beykpour, Twitter's product lead, received a complaint from cybersecurity expert Jackie Singh about Twitter's development priorities (which would have issues to address before the fleet mentioned above). Singh suggested four things: "Removing all coordinated inauthentic behavior," "Improving user experience regarding harassment and reporting," "Add dislike button or downvote capability," and "(Crackdown on) Disinformation harming users."

Beykpour replied as follows

#1, 2 and 4 are literally our top priority (making the public conversation on Twitter) and has been for years. We’ve made a lot of progress but still lots to do. We do feel it’s important to solve other problems too! As for #3, this is something we’re exploring.

As for the "dislike" button, Facebook once announced its introduction, but there were objections that it would lead to cyberbullying and denial of personality on the Internet, and eventually settled on reaction buttons includes Like, Love, Care, Haha, Wow, Sad and Angry.

Also, the downvote capability is probably a reference to the "upvote" and "downvote" features implemented on Reddit, a major message board. I can recall there being a similar feature on Japanese anonymous message boards where each user could raise or lower their score on a topic or comment.

Even if these introductions are being considered within Twitter, we can expect cyber bullying to intensify on Twitter, which is significantly more anonymous than Facebook. Maybe the installation of reaction buttons, following the same development as Facebook, would be a compromise.

Source: Kayvon Beykpour (Twitter)

Via: Mashable


This article is based on an article from the Japanese edition of Engadget and was created using the translation tool Deepl. The Japanese edition of Engadget does not guarantee the accuracy or reliability of this article.