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This article is based on an article from the Japanese edition of Engadget and was created using the translation tool Deepl.


An unopened NES (North American NES) version of Super Mario Bros. has been sold for $114,000 at Heritage Auctions, a Texas-based auction site in the US. This is the highest bid ever for a single video game.

In 2019, an unopened Super Mario Bros. sold at the same auction for $100,150, but the price was even higher than that.

According to a commentary from WatGames, a company of game collectors, there are 11 variations of the NES version of Super Mario's packaging.

According to US tech media Ars Technica, the one that hit a high this time is called the "3-code variant" and was introduced in mid-1987. This is said to be "a little easier to get" than the test version from late 1985 to early 1986, which was not shrink-wrapped and only had a sticker on the opening (the version that sold for the above $11 million). Nor was it the first shrink-wrapped one, dating back to mid-1986.

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The reason for the tremendous premium nonetheless is that the shrink-wrapped package contained a cardboard hangtab (used to hang the software on the wall in stores to display it). A game rep at Heritage Auction talked about how rare it was, stating, “I would suspect sealed cardboard hangtab copies [still available today] number in the single digits.” The reason those hangtabs are so rare is because they were opened so soon after the game was released.

The auctioneer, who is keeping the seller anonymous at his request, is speculating that this valuable item was "sold by a non-collector" and that he simply bought it in 1987, put it somewhere and forgot about it.

If you have memories of buying the game haphazardly and putting it away in a closet, or if you have a relative who was into video games for a while but then suddenly became enthralled, you might want to look for it at home.

Source: Heritage Auctions

Via: Ars Technica


This article is based on an article from the Japanese edition of Engadget and was created using the translation tool Deepl. The Japanese edition of Engadget does not guarantee the accuracy or reliability of this article.