SurfaceProX2
Microsoft

This article is based on an article from the Japanese edition of Engadget and was created using the translation tool Deepl.


Following the report of successfully running the virtualized Arm version of Windows 10 on a Mac with Apple Silicon M1 chip, benchmark results have been released. The scores reportedly outperformed the Surface Pro X (2nd generation), which is the original Arm version of Windows 10 machine.

Developer Alexander Graf, who has achieved a virtualized Arm Windows (Windows ARM 64 Insider Preview) on an M1-powered Mac, has made the necessary custom QEMU patches for it available to the mailing list for everyone to use.

This is why it is now possible for third parties to try out the virtualized Arm version of Windows and objectively measure how well it performs in practice.

As measured by Geekbench 5, the single-core score of the virtualized Arm version of Windows on an M1-based Mac was 1288 and the multi-core score was 5449, according to one of them.

GeekBench

In comparison, the second-generation Surface Pro X scored 799 and 3089, respectively, both of which were lower. Incidentally, the new Microsoft SQ2 processor in the latter was claimed to be the "fastest in its class".

GeekBench

These performance differences also apply to x86 (32-bit) apps on the Arm version of Windows 10 for both. Namely, running GeekBench 4 for x86, the Surface Pro X has a single-core score of 2019 and a multi-core of 6646, while the virtual Arm Windows on the M1Mac has 2533 and 8917 respectively.

Anyway, if the advantages of the M1 processor shown here are real, it could be a threat to many of the traditional Arm Windows 10 PCs. An Apple executive has stated that it is technically possible to run Windows 10 for Arm on M1 Macs, but it is "up to Microsoft (to decide if they want to license Windows for Arm to the public)," and it seems that Microsoft may have a tough decision to make.

Source: Sunshine Biscuit at scale(Twitter)

Via: MSPowerUser


This article is based on an article from the Japanese edition of Engadget and was created using the translation tool Deepl. The Japanese edition of Engadget does not guarantee the accuracy or reliability of this article.